“wo kann ich online zusätzliches Geld verdienen wie man Geld on-line täglich bildet”

Some themes allow you to translate only the checkout and system messages. If you need a full translation you must either change to a theme that supports the language you need, or, if you are confident with theme editing, then create a new locale file.

The second step is to work in an organized manner. Figure out what you need but don’t have, and name things. Pick variables to stand for the unknows, clearly labelling these variables with what they stand for. Draw and label pictures neatly. Explain your reasoning as you go along. And make sure you know just exactly what the problem is actually asking for. You need to do this for two reasons:

Esta União Europeia tem um papel decisivo a desempenhar na cena europeia liderando essa batalha e não alinhando atrás dos que vêem a segurança como única resposta para este problema aterrador. europarl.europa.eu

There is no such thing as a literal translation – languages are entirely different systems and you can’t impose Spanish on English or vice versa. English has its own structure and its own lexicon and Spanish has its own structure and its own lexicon, and they don’t occupy the same space. If it’s a question of my not being able to translate a passage because there are words I don’t know and I can’t find them anywhere, I can’t find them online and I can’t find them in my dictionaries, then I’ll ask the author. And if the author is no longer with us, then I will wing it, as we say, and just do the best I can.

I often think of translation as an aural/oral practice. You have to be able to hear the language of the original. You have to be able to hear the tonalities, what the language indicates about the intelligence or class of the speaker. You have to be able to hear that, in my case in Spanish. And then you have to be able to speak it in English. You know, some idiot asked Gregory Rabassa, García Márquez’s first translator of One Hundred Years of Solitude, if he knew enough Spanish to do it. And Gregory said: “You asked me the wrong question. The real question is, do I know enough English?” Ursula Kenny

Last week, I mentioned this experience to Ann Goldstein, the acclaimed translator of the Italian novelist Elena Ferrante. She laughed. “I know what you mean,” she said, down the line from New York. “My feeling about Proust is that he’s Scott-Moncrieff [C K Scott-Moncrieff, who published his English translation of A La recherche du temps perdu as Remembrance of Things Past in the 1920s]. I haven’t read the newer translations – but I don’t want to. I’m very attached to his, even though people always say ‘he did this’ or ‘he did that’.” If Goldstein is aware that for many people she will always, now, be the one and only translator of My Brilliant Friend and the other novels that make up Ferrante’s best-selling Neapolitan quartet, she gave no sign.

I didn’t meet the author but we corresponded by email after I sent her queries. I am fortunate because so many experienced and established translators share their advice with incredible generosity. It is a vibrant, supportive community with many workshops, summer schools and conferences where newcomers can learn from professionals. As a reader, I’m immensely grateful to translators who re-create the worlds of Jacek Hugo-Bader, Erri de Luca and Joseph Roth, such as Antonia Lloyd-Jones from Polish, Danièle Valin from Italian and Stéphane Pesnel from German.

I didn’t learn Italian until I was in my 30s, when I began taking weekly lessons with some of my colleagues in the office. The inspiration for it was that I wanted to read The Divine Comedy in Italian, and I dragged everybody else with me. Then about five years later, in 1992, the then editor of the New Yorker, Bob Gottlieb, a manuscript in Italian. It was by Aldo Buzzi, sent to him by the cartoonist Saul Steinberg, a friend of Buzzi’s. Bob wanted to write a note to Saul, so he ask me to read it so he knew what to say. I read it, and I liked it, so I decided to try translating it – and Bob published it. A year after that, someone asked me to translate my first book. It does feel strange to be a well known translator now, it’s totally unexpected. The idea that any translator would be at all well known strikes me as amazing.

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Naturally, publishers and booksellers alike are keen to capitalise on our exotic new appetites (to use the phrase “cash in” seems a bit unfair in these slightly rarefied circumstances). Nearly every week, publicists send me new or previously ignored (by us) foreign novels. Among those I’ve received this year, and thoroughly recommend, are Madonna in a Fur Coat by Sabahattin Ali (trans: Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe), a Turkish novel from 1943; The Day Before Happiness by Erri De Luca (trans: Jill Foulston), an Italian novel – it, too, is set in Naples – from 2009; and, most gripping of all, the Israeli page-turner Waking Lions by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen (trans: Sondra Silverston). Meanwhile, Daunt’s publishing wing has just brought out what I believe will be my next foreign read: Marie, by the French writer Madeleine Bourdouxhe (trans: Faith Evans). The chic book with which to be seen this summer, it was written in 1940 and is set in 1930s Paris. It tells the story of a happily married woman who has a passionate affair with a younger man. Comparisons have been made both to Proust and Virginia Woolf.

You can have one language active on your online store. Some themes include more than one language, with the translations already created for the theme. Translated content includes all the text in your store, such as product descriptions, contact information, and cart and checkout information.

A translation is a rigid movement of the graph. The reflected graph is the rigid movement of y = −|x|. The reflection therefore takes place before the translation to x = −4.   In other words, if you wrote the unreflected translation to (−3, −4) as

Since completing an MA in literary translation at the University of East Anglia in 2000, Don Bartlett has translated Danish and Norwegian authors including Jo Nesbø, Lars Saabye Christensen and Roy Jacobsen. He has translated Karl Ove Knausgaard’s six-volume autobiography My Struggle, which has been hailed as a literary phenomenon; the fifth instalment, Some Rain Must Fall, was published this year. Bartlett lives in Norfolk with his family.

I’ve only worked with two writers so far. Han Kang has good English, so she reads my translations, then talks to me about them. She’s not one of those nightmare authors some translators talk about. She has always been very generous in the way she collaborates. She thinks translation is artistic and creative in its own right, and that they’re “our” books. Bae Suah doesn’t read or speak English but is a translator herself, from German to Korean, and so also has a strong idea of translation as creative writing. She thinks I’m the best judge of how to make a book live in my language.

From Scandinavian crime to Elena Ferrante and Karl Ove Knausagaard, it’s boom time for foreign fiction in the UK. But the right translation is crucial, says Rachel Cooke, while, below, some of the best translators tell us their secrets

Which brings me back to where I started. Last year, in another sign of how things are changing, Waterstones launched its monthly Rediscovered Classics promotion with Sagan’s Bonjour Tristesse. I was happy about this, but disappointed, to put it mildly, to find that it was the Penguin Modern Classics edition that it had piled up in-store, awaiting new readers. So what I want to say now is this: if you tried it then and hated it, please, have another go, only this time entrust yourself to Irene Ash’s gorgeous 1955 translation. The story of a teenager called Cecile who discovers, during a golden Riviera holiday, that her beloved papa is to remarry, I am willing to bet it will cast a spell on you, whether you are poolside, or stuck at home in Britain, watching the rain.

Languages include: English, Albanian, Azerbaijani, Portuguese, Bulgarian, Faroese, French, German, Icelandic, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kurdish, Japanese, Kazakh, Korean, Spanish, Mongolian, Quechan, Portuguese,…MORE Russian, Tatar, Zulu, Basque, Catalan, Galician, Swiss German, Chinese (traditional and simplified), Dutch, Danish, Polish and Welsh.

Of the four of us who walked across the border into Austria in 1956 only my father spoke English. What he spoke, he remembered from his school days. I had a bilingual edition of AA Milne’s Now We Are Six from which I had learned the useful words and, but, so…

Global information management company hires freelance translators for translation jobs. The company is a supplier of localization services to the IT, engineering, e-business & multimedia sectors, and experience in those and other business sectors is helpful. Requirements are a minimum 2 years freelance (or 1 year in-house) translation experience, but the company says it accepts “translators with relevant alternative experience or qualifications.”

The book I am proudest of is a book of poetry called The Solitudes by a 17th-century poet, whose last name is Góngora, and it is the most difficult poetry that I have ever run across in any language. Very complex structure. And it’s absolutely beautiful, gorgeous poetry. And I thought, oh my God, if I can do this, I can leap tall buildings in a single bound – there’s nothing I can’t do.

Deborah Smith is translator of The Vegetarian by the Korean writer Han Kang; she and Kang are the co-winners of the Man Booker International prize 2016. She is also the translator of Kang’s more recent novel, Human Acts, and of another Korean writer, Bae Suah. She lives in London, where she has recently set up a non-profit publisher, Tilted Axis Press; its first book, Panty by Sangeeta Bandyopadhyay, translated from the Bengali by Arunava Sinha, is out now.

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